Mirai of the Future (2018): On Family Bond and Ancestry

I’ll always be a big-fan of heartwarming, sometimes tear-jerker films from Japan, and this film is one of them.

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Mirai/ Mirai of the Future/ 未来のミライ(2018) is the fifth feature-length film by Mamoru Hosoda (The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, Summer Wars) produced by Studio Chizu. In Mirai, Hosoda proved himself as a capable auteur by bringing his personal account of childhood and fatherhood into the film[1]. The keywords of the bond between family members and sibling jealousy are bottled up with grasping visualisation of childhood imagination from the eye of protagonist Kun.

Kun, 4 years old, showered with his parents’ affection until they decide to surprise him with a baby sister Mirai. The story follows Kun’s encounters with people in his family and his journey accepting Mirai as a part of his family and life.

Perhaps, Hosoda drew the inspiration from Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol to envision Kun’s encounter with his family members in the imaginative, fantastic, past-present-future format. It shows Yukko, the family dog, as a human-form prince hilariously whining about Kun replacing his parents’ former affection toward him. Then the audiences are transported back to post WWII Japan, where Kun met his grand grandfather. Finally, as the title suggests, we met teenage Mirai on several occasions throughout the film, climaxing on Kun’s acceptance for Mirai’s existence (that hits me right into the feels!).

The film is light and comical. It’s something you could watch as a family, but lavish in moral lessons and philosophy to teach your kids and even yourself to reflect on. I couldn’t help but smiling ear to ear as I left the cinema seats.

I had the similar Kun–Mirai’s situation 20 years ago. That’s why, ladies and gentlemen, I can extremely relate to it. (Anyway, I’m sorry Duff for almost hitting your baby face with a baton 20 years ago).

I had the similar Kun–Mirai’s situation 20 years ago. That’s why, ladies and gentlemen, I can extremely relate to it. (Anyway, I’m sorry Duff for almost hitting your baby face with a baton 20 years ago).

I believe that the bond and communication between family members surpass beyond the reasoning. Like Death.   I remember hearing someone said this somewhere, long time ago when I was a BA student. It’s something that I keep grasp up to this day.

I believe that the bond and communication between family members surpass beyond the reasoning. Like Death.

I remember hearing someone said this somewhere, long time ago when I was a BA student. It’s something that I keep grasp up to this day.


FOOTNOTES

[1] Stevens, J. (2018). Interview: Mamoru Hosoda on Mirai, Family and Studio Chizu. [online] Anime UK News. Available at: https://animeuknews.net/2018/10/interview-mamoru-hosoda-on-mirai-family-and-studio-chizu/ [Accessed 4 Nov. 2018].

Photos are obtained from my mum’s photo album and sent via Whatsapp messaging service.